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Posts Tagged ‘knitting’

Last we left the Infernal Sock Yarn Rascal had snapped the yarn and I was looking for a place in the pattern where I could join the yarn. Well that is done. Today I thought I’d talk about symmetrical yarn overs because they are all over this sock.

Symmetrical yarn overs means getting the yarn over between a knit and a purl stitch to match the yarn over between two knit stitches. Usually the yarn over between a knit and a purl stitch tends to be larger because the yarn is wrapped completely around the needle. This causes more yarn to be used in making the yarn over and thus a larger yarn over.

Here’s what to do if you want symmetrical yarn overs.

First, do not wrap the yarn around the needle after the knit stitch. Leave the yarn in the back as if you were going to knit the next stitch.

1 knitted lace

Second, insert your needle purlwise into the next stitch and lay the yarn over the top of the working needle.

2 knitted lace

Third, purl the stitch as usual catching the yarn laid on top.

3 knitted lace

At the end, it looks like this.

4 lace knitting

The purl stitch and yarn over are made. Because the amount of yarn in making the yarn over nearly equals the amount of yarn made in a yarn over between two knit stitches the holes will be the same size.

When working the next round after making the yarn over between the knit and purl stitch you will need to reseat the yarn over so it sits nicely like all the other stitches and work it according to what is called for in the pattern.

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Five months after we got Yarn Rascal I initiated The Golden Paw Award. The award is given for rascal behavior that goes above and beyond what is usual. This time Yarn Rascal really outdid himself and so he gets a Golden Paw.

Picture2

Yarn Rascal has a sunny personality. But his sun really shines when he is doing something he is not suppose to be doing. It goes beyond just delight, he is besides himself with ecstasy.

In February I had extensive oral surgery on the same day there was a SuperFull Moon and an evening snow storm moving in. Yarn Rascal is affected by full moons and snow storms. He gets very excited, happy beyond description, and loses all self-control. To have both happening at the same time is akin to disaster.

It was 10 hours after my oral surgery and I was still bleeding quite a bit and in a good amount of pain when Yarn Rascal just couldn’t contain himself any longer. I had decided to use the tea bag remedy to staunch the bleeding. (Wet a tea bag of black tea and put it on the bleeding area applying pressure. The tannic acid in black tea shrinks and closes the small blood vessels and stops the bleeding.) I was also in pain with my neck, shoulders and upper back so I decided to do a gentle yoga stretch to relieve the discomfort while waiting for the tea bag to work.

 I went into the bedroom where it was quiet. The Skipper was glued to the basketball games on tv in the living room and Yarn Rascal was nowhere to be seen. That last fact  should have raised alarm bells in me. I sat on the floor and eased myself into a yoga position that resembled badly tangled yarn. I was reassuring myself that my shoulders were not going to dislocate when the thundering of little feet came down the hall. Yarn Rascal, running at full tilt, tail flying behind him wagging for all it was worth, came tearing into the room with my hand knit corriedale sock clamped in his mouth, made two 360s around me and raced back out. My natural instinct to tense up kicked in and the new pain that shot up my neck and across my upper back was phenomenal.

I managed to untangle myself with maximum pain and went in search of Yarn Rascal. Yarn Rascal does not like corriedale. Merino is one of his great loves so I couldn’t quite comprehend what he was doing with this particular sock nor how he got at it.

Moving like the hunchback of Notre Dame and with the wadded tea bags in my mouth I went in search of Yarn Rascal. In the living room as still as a statue was The Skipper. It was hard to see whether he was breathing or not, but I could tell he was alive because his eyeballs were roaming over the television screen.

Trying to keep the pressure on the wad of tea bags while not letting them fall from my mouth I tried to say “Help me get the dog.”  It came out “Hef me gef fa dog.” The eyeballs didn’t even stutter as they watched the tv. Before I could get another sentence out, Yarn Rascal came rushing down the stairs with the corriedale sock and the infernal sock attached to its dpns in his mouth.  Streaming behind him was the infernal sock’s yarn.

I took up my best linebacker stance to grab the little imp, but Yarn Rascal is a stellar running back. He can fake out any NFL defensive player. Naturally, as he whizzed by I missed. However, the infernal sock’s yarn caught on The Skipper’s recliner and the next sounds I heard were thwang and snap. I can’t begin to tell you how much I hate it when I have to join in yarn and on the infernal sock there is no good place to make such a join.

I attempted a hunchback version of a run to get the dog while I remembered that on the instructions regarding post oral surgery I was to rest. I was not to run, exercise, bend over, or lift anything. I was going to die.

I finally trapped Yarn Rascal in the craft room. His tail wagged so hard his whole body followed suit. Super full moon, snow storm, knitting and yarn that mommy didn’t want him to have, what more could one dog ask for?

That’s why this Golden Paw Award is for Yarn Rascal.

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I’ve had the Louisa Harding Amitola Annwn scarf done except for two rows and the bind off for about 2 years. Yes, this is the height of procrastination. I just couldn’t seem to find the time to finish it.

Then Dartmoor Yarns on her blog dared me in her comment section to finish the endless WIP. Even as a child I couldn’t resist a dare and I haven’t, it seems, outgrown that even at the age of 63.

I present to you the finished Annwn Scarf.

louisa harding amitala scarf 2

louisa harding amitala annwn scarf 1

The scarf (she also has a wrap in the same pattern) is by Louisa Harding and knit in her yarn Amitola which is a wool and silk blend. Knit on US 6 (UK 8) 4 mm needles.

I love the way the cable balances the ruffled edge of the scarf. It really is an easy knit. I just ended up getting distracted by other projects. Thanks Dartmoor Yarns for helping me finish this!

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The Infernal Socks

I am currently working on what I call “the infernal” socks. They are my masochistic knitting project for this month.

rose rib socks knitt lace

They will be bed socks. The socks on the left are a photograph from the book Sock Knitting Master Class. The one on the right I just finished and haven’t blocked yet. The pattern is Rose Rib Socks by Evelyn Clark. They are finicky to knit.

First they are cuff down. I hate working socks that way. I am a toe up person. I could have altered the pattern to make it toe up but in the end decided to stay with the pattern as written. Mistake number one.

Socks that fit me best are ones without gussets. These have gussets. I hate working gussets in cuff down socks. Picking up gusset stitches is bad enough on its own. Add a dark yarn and night knitting and I need a klieg light and magnifying glasses to see the proper stitches to pick up. Once done, the stitches on the dpns are unwieldy and not evenly divided over the needles. This drives me nuts just looking at it.

Next come the dreadful decreases on every other row on both sides of the instep. I am famous for decreasing on one side and forgetting to do the same on the other. I have come up with a plan that helps me mark the points where the decreases need to be made at the time they need to be made but it is a lot of moving around colored stitch markers. I hate fiddling with stitch markers every row. The decreasing portion can’t go fast enough for me.

Then there is a small reprieve of straight knitting before I get to the toe and more decreases. This time I need to remember to decrease two stitches each side of the instep every other row. That’s a total of four chances in one row that I get to screw up. The stitches become less, the sock gets smaller and smaller, my knitting gets tighter and tighter and then I am left with an opening of 16 measly stitches through which I need to fit the entire sock so I can then Kitchener stitch the opening closed. For me, Kitchener stitch has endless possibilities for going wrong so I need to close myself in the bathroom where my attention won’t be disturbed by Yarn Rascal or The Skipper. Then finally the horrid little experience of making one sock is over with.

Did I tell you that the rose rib pattern is intricate? Eight rows of intricacy. No mindless knitting here. Even though I counted rows I somehow continually left out rows 5 and 6. To fix that I have to rip back to the start of the sock. There is no easy place to pick up stitches otherwise. I have never used  a life line when knitting socks but I am now using one for these.

I’ve started the second sock. I look forward to it being done.

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I’ve been on a knitting roll that is about to come to an abrupt end. The projects seemed to roll off my needles easily but now I am embarking on masochistic knitting projects and they won’t be flying off my needles so effortlessly.

The last of the knitting roll projects is finished.

log cabin gloves knitting free pattern

log cabin gloves knitting back side

These are a free pattern from Fringe Association called Log Cabin Mitts. They were fun to knit. The yarn is Shelter from Brooklyn Tweed in the colorways Iceberg, Tartan and Almanac. The second picture shows the front and palm of the mitt. They are sturdy and warm. The best knitting attribute is that the thumb gusset is a pleasure to work. No fiddly gusset here. I am studying the construction of the thumb gusset to see if I can adapt it to other mitts I might make in the future.

This morning I had a surprise visitor waiting for me on the back patio.

barred owl

It’s a Barred Owl. Although I have heard owls I have never seen one in the wild. This is my first. I was so happy. I snapped him with my phone camera, but wished I had my Canon camera to do him more justice. He’s a kind of cool persona. He let me come out and talk with him and he didn’t fly away or get upset. I’d love to see him again.

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If you love a big cozy shawl then Sprig of Hope shawl is a must knit.

sprig of hope hand knit shawl

The lace pattern is bold enough to be visible and not  get lost amid a yarn with multiple colors in it. I used Madeline Tosh DK with size US 8 (5 mm) circular needles. The colorway is Firewood. I loved the knitting and the lace edging is simple to follow. It is a delightfully cozy shawl and I love wrapping myself up in it on cold nights.

I would like to say that the knitting gods left me alone during this knit but that would not be the truth. When I completely finished the shawl and laid it out for blocking I realized I’d dropped a stockinette stitch. How I managed this is a wonder. It should have been immediately recognizable while I was knitting. But the gods had other plans.

Wanting to impale myself on my knitting needles I ran through the other options I had.  First, my perfectionist self said let the shawl dry then rip it back the full two-thirds to where the mistake was and reknit from there. This thought stayed with me for quite awhile as I stared at the dropped stitch. It turned what was to be a relaxing day into one where my blood pressure pounded at my temples.

Next came the small voice of sanity. Fix the mistake by using a crochet needle to weave the dropped stitch up and then securely sew the free loop to the back of the shawl. It took me all of 15 minutes to do this and the mistake is not visible from the front nor is the sewing obvious in the back. Even better, it is not a weak point in the knitting. I’ve been wearing the shawl often and it is still holding strong.

The next picture has nothing to do with the shawl. It is Yarn Rascal in his holiday bow-tie.

yarn rascal in holiday bow tie

What he is staring at is The Skipper who came in to the room holding a skein of merino yarn that Yarn Rascal hadn’t molested seen yet. It was to be one of his holiday presents. Let’s just say he got that particular present early.

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Good Sock Yarns

I’ve been down my rabbit hole lately researching different breeds of sheep and the wool they produce. I’ve been reading The Fleece and Fiber Source Book. It contains information on over 200 breeds of sheep and their wool. You see, I’ve discovered that the much heralded merino wool is not good sturdy yarn for socks even if it is blended with nylon. In short, it doesn’t wear well. It is not suited to the job. Then why, you might ask, do all fingering and sock yarns feature merino. That’s business ladies and gentlemen. The manufacturers sell you on what they know to be not up to the task so that it wears out quickly and SURPRISE you have to come back for more. Built in obsolescence.

I spend a lot of time knitting socks, especially for The Skipper. I hate it when I spend that much time on a project for it to last barely one season. Thus my search for better sock yarns.

I found that socks fall into three categories. The durable and hard wearing that are worn with boots or hiking shoes, the everyday ones worn with regular shoes, and luxury ones usually reserved for bed or times when you need comforting in your soul. Merino fits the last category and while it is often blended with nylon, nylon does not wear as well or as long as silk. So if it is a luxury sock that will be lightly worn go for a merino silk blend.

The softer the fiber the more pilling and wear will occur. In short it is more fragile. Merino falls into this category. I won’t bore you with micron counts or staple lengths or amount of crimp. But all three factors affect the sturdiness of a yarn.

If you are going for a boot sock Romney may be your best bet but with a few caveats. First, it easily felts. Second, it is not highly elastic. Third, the yarn is not super lofty. But for durability it is great.

Thinking of an every day sock? You have a number of choices: Bluefaced Leicester, Wensleydale, Leicester Longwool, Columbia, Polwarth, Corriedale, and Cheviot. Look for a tight twist with at least 3 plys. The tighter the twist the more durable the yarn.

Finally, the very last thing you should do with any hand knit sock is walk around the house in it without some kind of footwear on. Walking only in your socks causes greater wear and tear on the fabric than wearing them with shoes. Who knew?

 

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