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Yes it is ready for its moment in the spotlight.

cape ann afghan 1

My Cape Ann Afghan.

acape ann afghan edge 2

Looking at it gives me such a feeling of accomplishment. Memories of time and place are woven into these stitches and forever entwined with them.

cape ann afghan cu edge

cape ann afghan 2

The free pattern in pdf form can be found here on my Ravelry page for download now.

Have a good weekend.

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I’ve been crocheting like mad on the Cape Ann Afghan. I’m on row 7 of what I think will be an 11 row length. Joining as I go has its benefits. I don’t collect a pile of hexagons that haunt me until they are joined. I’ve crocheted afghans that way, collecting the squares and then having to sew them all together. I don’t like the sewing. I’ve never felt it was a permanent enough join for something I spent a ton of time on crocheting. But it really is the piles of squares, as they sit waiting, that kills me. They are like a reproach when I see them. I feel as if I haven’t done enough, that I have fallen short.

I have tried hiding the squares as they accumulate. Putting them in drawers or plastic bins. Shutting them away from casual sight. But there they are when I open the drawer or bin to add more freshly made brethren. Ready to accuse me of not doing enough again.

Of course with the Yarn Rascal (aka Randi) around, anything short of locking both yarn and afghan in a vault spells its demise. Did I tell you the Rascal climbs? Yes, he scales dressers like a rock climber scales a rock climbing wall. I’ve never seen a dog do this. He only needs to have a whiff of a sense that a crocheted or knitted project or perhaps—and this is real glee for him—innocent, unprotected yarn, is up there and Wham! He scales the dresser using the draw handles like a climber on a rock wall, seizes his prize and poof! he’s gone. The next 15 minutes is spent trying to catch him or get him to drop whatever it is he stole. It’s a great game for him.

I found out I can move pretty fast at my age and there is something freeing that wells up into a child-like happiness from this. The scientist would probably say the feeling is the result of endorphins being released. I think it”s the feeling of relief over recapturing the yarn or object before it is torn to shreds.

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A saturated meadow,
Sun-shaped and jewel-small,
A circle scarcely wider
Than the trees around were tall;
Where winds were quite excluded,
And the air was stifling sweet
With the breath of many flowers,—
A temple of the heat.

Robert Frost Rose Pogonia

Yes, the sun is shining once again. The purple finches are hatching their second round of babies as are the two blue bird families. The second round of house wren babies have already fledged and their beautifully wound-up songs have, for the most part, receded from the summer sounds.

A new baby fawn graces the deer herd in the area. After watching the fawn and doe for an hour, I am pretty certain it is a male. Rambunctious and daring, the fawn reminded me of Randi, my little yarn rascal.

I promised the second part of the Cape Ann Afghan and here it is. I rewrote the first part, cleaning up the wording and editing for uniformity.

Hope everyone has a lovely weekend.

Cape Ann Afghan Part II

Joining Hexagons As You Go for Second and Following Rows
Join D in first corner ch1 space. Ch 2 (counts as first dc). In same space, work 2 dc. Insert hook into corner ch 1 space of completed hexagon. Join. Still working in the same ch 1 space of unfinished hexagon, work 3 dc.

*Insert hook into next ch 1 space of completed hexagon. Join. In next ch 1 space of incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc. Insert hook into next ch 1 space of completed hexagon. Join. In ch1 corner space of incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc. You are now at the point where two completed hexagons already join. The incomplete hexagon is joined to the two completed ones with sl sts as follows: Insert hook into corner ch 1 space of hexagon on the right. Join. Insert hook in corner ch 1 space of hexagon on the left. Join. Still working in same corner ch 1 space of incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc.* Repeat from * to * once more.

Insert hook into next ch 1 space of completed hexagon. Join. In next ch 1 space of incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc. Insert hook into next ch 1 space of completed hexagon. Join. In ch1 corner space of incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc. Insert hook into corner ch 1 space of completed hexagon. Join. Still working in same corner ch 1 space of incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc.

Working only on incomplete hexagon, ch 1. Work 3 dc in next ch 1 space. Ch 1. In next corner space, work 3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc. Ch 1. Work 3 dc in next ch 1 space. Ch 1. Join with sl st to first dc. Finish off. Cut yarn.

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This week has been gray, wet and humid. The bugs are having a wonderful time. The mosquitoes are plentiful. Therefore, I have been spending a lot of time indoors working on the hexagon afghan.

ls

It is not finished by any means, what with 11 more rows, but I have come to the spot where I can share the design. The motifs, the way I am joining them, and the edging I’ll be working are all set in stone, so to speak.
Therefore, if you feel like you need some color in your life, or a project that you can just easily putter on with, here is the loosely written pattern for my afghan that I have named Cape Ann. I am using US terminology here.

Cape Ann Afghan

Size: 45 x 60 inches (114.30 x 152.40 cm). You can make it any size you want by adding more motifs across a row to widen it, or decreasing the number to slim it down or adding rows to lengthen or decreasing rows to shorten.

Yarn: Worsted Weight or Bulky will work. I used worsted weight Valley Yarns Northampton (100% wool, 247 yds, 100 grams) in the colors:
A) Bright Pink (approximately 500 yds)
B) Spring Blue (approximately 900 yds)
C) Lake Heather (approximately 1,000 yds)
D) Natural (approximately 1, 700 yds)
Depending on the size you are making the yard amounts will vary. Again, I have not finished the afghan so I am sharing with you the amount of yarn I bought after some rough estimation.

Hook: US 9/5.50mm

Gauge: A completed motif measures 5 x 5 inches (12.70 x 12.70 cm). You don’t need to get this gauge. Measure your motif. Take the motif measurement and divide it into the desired width of your finished afghan. The number you get is the number of motifs you need to make up one row. Then, take the motif measurement and divided it into the desired length of your finished afghan. The number you get is the number of rows you need.

The motif is worked from the center out: flower center (A), petals (B), leaves (C), background (D).

With A: Ch4. Join to form ring. Ch2 (counts as first dc). Dc 17 more times in ring. Join with slipstitch to first dc. 18 dc. Finish off. Cut yarn.

dc in chain

Join B to first dc. Ch3 (counts as first hdc). Hdc once in each of next 2 dc. Ch1. *Hdc once in each of next 3 dc. Ch1.* Repeat from * to * around. Join with slipstitch to first hdc. 18 hdc and 6 ch1 spaces. Finish off. Cut yarn.

join b

Join C in first Ch1 space. Ch2 (counts as first dc). In same ch sp work two more dc, ch1, 3dc. First corner made. Ch1. *In next ch1 sp work 3dc, ch1, 3dc, ch1.* Repeat from * to *. Join with slipstitch to first dc. Hexagon shape formed. 6 corners with ch1 spaces and 6 ch1 space sides made. Finish off. Cut yarn.

join c

Join D in first corner ch1 space. Ch2 (counts as first dc). In same space work 2 dc, ch1, 3dc. First corner made. Ch1. In next ch sp work 3 dc, ch1.* In next corner space work 3 dc, ch1, 3dc, ch1. In next ch sp work 3dc, ch1.* Repeat from * to *. Join with slipstitch to first dc. Finish off. Cut yarn.

Your first motif is complete.

Joining Motifs As You Go for First Row of Afghan.
To add more motifs to your first row complete the above steps for joining colors A through C. Where you join the hexagons together you will be substituting a joining slipstitch for a ch1.

Join hexagons together for first row of afghan as follows:
Join D in first corner ch1 space. Ch2 (counts as first dc). In same space work 2dc. Insert hook from front to back into corner ch1 space on completed hexagon.

cj1

Wrap yarn around hook from left to right, pull loop through corner ch1 space on completed hexagon and loop on hook from incomplete hexagon.

cj2 yarn position

Hexagons are joined. Still working in the same ch1 space as before on the incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc.

complete corner where joined

Insert hook from front to back into next ch1 space on completed hexagon. Join hexagons as detailed above. Work 3 dc in ch1 space on incomplete hexagon.

second join

Insert hook from front to back into next ch 1 space on completed hexagon. Join hexagons. Work 3dc on incomplete hexagon. Insert hook from front to back into corner ch1 space of completed hexagon. Join hexagons. Still working in the same ch1 space as before on the incomplete hexagon, work 3 dc, ch1.

third join

Working only on incomplete hexagon: 3 dc in next ch1 space, ch1. *In corner ch1 sp work 3 dc, ch1, 3dc, ch1. In next ch1 space work 3dc, ch1.* Repeat from * to *. Join with slipstitch to first dc.

Special Stitches
Hdc (half double crochet): Yarn over hook, insert hook into stitch, pull up loop, yarn over hook, draw through two loops, yarn over hook, insert hook into same stitch, pull up loop, yarn over, draw through two loops, yarn over, draw through last three loops.

Friday I will give details for joining motifs on the second and all following rows.
I am writing up these instructions and will post them on Ravelry in pdf format. They will be free. I just need to complete more of the afghan so my yarn yardage is accurate. My Ravelry name is Slippedstitches.

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