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Archive for the ‘style sheet’ Category

Finally, the pattern writing part. Pages are numbered, the header is the name of the pattern, the footer is copyright and contact info. This is page 2 of the pattern. Skip a space or two and begin.

All headings regarding garment names such as, Hat, Sweater, Gloves, Scarf, Socks etc. are written in Heading 1 in Word. All headings regarding garment pieces such as, Brim, Crown Shaping, Sleeves, Back, Right Front, Neck, Wrist, Thumb, etc. use Heading 2. When writing about garment pieces within an instruction always capitalize the first letter of the names of the garment pieces . For example, “Work Left Front same as Back.”

Paragraphing occurs whenever there is a logical break where the knitter will naturally look away from the pattern for a time before completing the next instruction. At these “look away” points, one paragraph ends and the next begins.

Use italics for construction notes. For example, at the same time. Or when signaling an instruction applies to only certain sizes. For example:
Size 6 mos only:
Inc Row: Increase 12 sts evenly across row.

Rows / Rnds are written in bold. For example, Row 1:. While some use ordinal numbers with superscripts as in 1st Row, I dislike it. I also haven’t seen it making big inroads to becoming a common way to denote rows or rounds. Do place periods at the end of row / round instructions. If delineation between a RS and WS row is necessary cite it like this: Row 1 (RS): and then the instructions. Don’t let instructions peter out and become vague at the end of a row or round. For example:
Row 1: K1, p1; rep to end of row. Or Row 1: K1, p1 across row. If a certain number of sts at the end of a row or round are worked differently than what has come before them, write it out Row 1: K1, pl to last 3 sts. K3. Don’t assume the knitter will just know what to do with the last few stitches at the end of a row or round. If the last few stitches are always worked the same way at the end of each row, it can be written as a pattern note before starting the segment. Be aware too that many knitters, myself included, will blissfully knit on forgetting the pattern note only to remember it 4″ (10) cm later.

Every row / round that includes decreases or increases should have a stitch count at the end of the row. Yes, even if only 1 st was changed. The exception is when a stitch pattern has accurate st counts only after a certain row is completed. Then an accurate st count goes at the end of that specific row taking into account the increases and decreases that occurred in the previous rows. Remaining stitches can be cited this way: K2tog, p1.–84( 89, 93) sts rem.

There is more regarding style sheets and the use of parenthetical marks (), brackets [], asterisks *, citing complex stitches, and when one can accurately claim a pattern is both charted and written.

Until then. Enjoy your weekend. I am having oral surgery on Friday and hope to be more myself by Monday. By the way, I haven’t knitted a thing this whole time. With the medication, I haven’t dared pick up needles and yarn. Not being able to knit is having an unnerving effect on me. The Skipper is spending a lot of time in his man cave areas of the house. Yarn Rascal spends his time curled up with me giving me comfort and love.

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As my luck would have it, March, and I mean the entire month, can’t move on and be done with fast enough. Two minutes after midnight, that is two minutes into 1 March, I was in the emergency room of the one hospital that is close to me, but which I highly distrust because they are simply awful.

In seeking help, I increased the pain in the tooth and added on an allergic reaction from the medication they gave me. Let’s just say I am up to my ears in medical stuff I don’t like and won’t have relief from the pain until Friday. All my breast cancer tests, MRI with contrast and mammogram, scheduled for today have been canceled and need rescheduling. We have an ice storm visiting. None of what is going on medically should kill me, but when I am in this kind of pain that is made worse by weather fronts it is a special kind of hell.

Please make this month go fast, please, please, please.

Back to the Style Sheet for knitters and crocheters.

Following the first page is, naturally, the second page. Number the pattern pages following the first page. It’s about a 50-50 split between those who print out a pattern and those who only use electronic devices to access the pattern. Thus, it is still advisable to format a header that includes the name of the pattern and the page number. The footer on the inside pages include copyright information, your name or business name and a way of contacting you such as email or pm via Ravelry.

While a debate continues on where to place the list of abbreviations used within the pattern, I tend to favor placing it on the second page. The Craft Yarn Council has a list of standard abbreviations. The Abbreviation List is in alphabetical order. The first letter of most abbreviations is lowercase and the abbreviation itself is in bold. The abbreviations for WS (wrong side) and RS (right side) rows are always in caps. Within a pattern, abbreviations are lowercase unless they begin a sentence or signify row side.

After the Abbreviations List comes two more items: Stitch Patterns and / or Pattern Notes. Stitch Pattern cites those patterns you are not charting. A particular ribbing, a particular overall pattern with unusual components, an uncommon cast on.

Pattern Notes is where information goes that applies to the whole pattern. For example, accurate stitch counts occur only after completion of a WS row. If a note does not apply to the entire pattern, then place the note in a sidebar and put it right where the information is needed.

It is now time for my pain medication after which I won’t even be sure of my name.

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I have decided to do a couple of fasts posts giving the elements of a style sheet for knitters / crocheters who are interested in self-publishing. I do this with this caveat: This is the style I use. Other styles are out there, so look around. The information contained below is not chiseled in granite. These are the things that work for me. Do experiment and find what works for you.

What Info Goes On the First Page

1) Design Title

2) A picture of the garment or object. Recommended size 3 x 4″ (8 x 10) cm. Where you place it is up to you. My strong recommendation is to make the design of all the pages in your pattern as clean and easy to read as possible. Study patterns with layouts you like. Adopt what you like and leave the rest.

3) Your name or your business name.

4) Description of the item. This is the romance part. Include inspiration for the design. A description of construction. Sell the person on why he / should buy this pattern and how it will make life better. Keep the description short. Avoid superlatives.

5) Sizes. For sweaters, I like to list 2 chest sizes. The “To Fit Chest” measurement and the “Finished Chest Measurements”. The “To Fit” measurement tells the crafter the actual chest size without ease. The “Finished” measurement is the size of the sweater after it is seamed and blocked and includes the amount of ease.

6) Yarn. The format for listing yarn is this: Yarn Company Yarn Name (fiber content %; yds [m] / oz [g]) per skein; weight; color. Number of skeins.

7) Needles. US size (mm size) straight, circular or dpns, If necessary, change needle size in order to obtain gauge. When listing circular needles: US size (mm size) circular length in inches (cm). For those outside the US, mm size is listed before US size.

8) Notions. Tapestry or darning needle, types of stitch markers, stitch holders, ribbons, buttons, etc.

9) Difficulty level. Go here for how to assess skill levels.

10) If I have specific construction techniques I want to highlight, I list them under Design Elements. An example of design elements for a sock might be short-row toe, round heel, gusset, provisional cast on, lace, etc.

11) Gauge / Tension. Stitch number and row number = 4″ (10) cm with Needle size used followed by the type of stitch. For example, 36 sts and 15 rows = 4″ (10) cm with US 6 (4 mm) needles over pattern stitch. Outside the US list cm and mm before US measurements.

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