Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2015

We’re at 8 degrees Farenheit, which is around -13 Celsius, and the polar vortex winds are in full force. Outside the many windowed house, Susie and I watch as the fine snow from yesterday spirals and circles in the wind. The flying snow glittering in the sun, looks like the interior of a snow globe. We watch this from under two down comforters on a big soft couch. Only our eyes show above the comforter unless I have to sneeze and then my entire head is out from underneath.

Yes, in addition to my cat allergy I have managed to catch a head cold. A wicked beast it is along with the allergy. In order to keep a passage way open for breathing I procured a jar of Vicks-Vapo Rub. When I was a kid, I can remember my mother rubbing this on my chest, covering me in flannel, kissing me good night and telling me I’d feel better in the morning. I don’t remember ever feeling better in the morning, though. Still, the smell of it brings a certain comfort and while I don’t rub it on me, just taking the lid off the jar and inhaling its smell opens my airways just a bit. Today my head will only pop out from under the comforter to sneeze, cough, and take a snort of Vicks-Vapo Rub. Oh, and to put allergy drops in my eyes.

Susie has taken to curling up on my chest right under my chin. I can hear and feel her purr, which is pretty neat until I have to sneeze.

On the knitting front I am working on the Canyonette Shawl. But look what else I found on Ravelry.

audrey hepburn shawl 1

The Audrey Hepburn Shawl by Slipper Snatcher and it is a free download.

audrey hepburn shawl 2

audrey hepburn shawl 3

Insanely beautiful, isn’t it? It makes me want to have the lifestyle where I could wear something as elegant and ethereal as this. In truth, my lifestyle never calls for elegant or ethereal. Besides, Yarn Rascal would have it in shreds within 2 seconds of me putting it on. Still, I am in love with this shawl.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Latest Finished Objects

knit lace shawl

The small shawl that was part of my easy knitting period after I scrapped Ming Blue is complete. The design is not my own. It comes from the book Traditional Shawls. I hope I’ve got the name right, as I am still house and cat sitting I don’t have the book here to verify the name, but I will get it for you.

knit lace shawl cu

The shawl was made with one skein of MadelineTosh Light in the Happiness colorway. I purchased the yarn from Happy Knits. Love that store and the yarns they carry. Really nice people too.

The other finished object are the socks.

dead simple lace socks knit

My adapted version of “Dead Simple Lace Socks” by Wendy Johnson from her book Socks From the Toe Up (hope I got that name right).

knit lace socks

The yarn is Jill Draper Makes Stuff Splendor Sock Yarn in the Glacier colorway. Unfortunately, Splendor is no longer available and this skein came from my stash and the few precious ones I have left.

Today appears to be cuddle day for Susie, the cat. Not a bad choice since it is snowing. Did I mention that I am terribly allergic to cats? As soon as this latest cuddle fest end its allergy medication time.

Read Full Post »

This week I am house and cat sitting much to Yarn Rascal’s chagrin. It’s a large house. Lots of big windows. So when the Polar Vortex swept in last night it made itself known right away, banging into the largest of the windows. After I scraped the cat and me off the ceiling, I grabbed an extra down comforter to wrap us in while I knit. Susie likes to watch the yarn and needles move. Periodically she reaches out her tiny paw and touches the yarn. She’s very sweet and very gentle. It was almost a Norman Rockwell kind of scene.

As it neared midnight and the winds continued howling and battering, I noticed a light outside going on and off where no light should be. A short span of woods and a stone wall were in that area. I eased out from beneath the warm comforters and ran up to the second floor windows to get a better look. From the darkness of the second floor I could better see what was going on. A truck was parked blocking the road and the light I saw was coming from a flashlight a man was holding. In my mind it looked like he was looking for a way to come up and onto the property.

Out where I am located, calling the police is futile. I’d die long before they got here, and that’s assuming they could find their way here. So the option never crossed my mind. Instead, I came down stairs and grabbed my extra pointy Addi Turbo knitting needles while at the same time carefully slipping my knitting off them. The wind had been up for some time so I knew I could count on finding good-sized branches to use as clubs outside.

Nature didn’t fail me. She almost killed me, but she didn’t fail me. As I stealthily crossed the lawn, sneaking from tree to tree, I was almost flattened by a falling branch. I had a moment of confusion when I dithered over whether I should carry the heavy tree branch with my left arm which is my mastectomy side or whether it would be better to have the pointy knitting needles in the weaker arm’s hand.

I know little about attack tactics. I don’t know how to go about planning them nor do I know how to carry them out. And truly, I am not interested in knowing. I only know there I was a woman with one breast, sharp knitting needles in the left hand and a tree branch that was killing my arm and wrist in my right hand. Truthfully, I was hoping that by the time I had outfitted myself fully the guy would have gotten in his truck and left. But he didn’t.

My intention was to jump on top of the stone wall and stand there brandishing my Addi Turbos and the dang tree branch and surprise him. Instead, I missed the top of the wall. Or I should say, my feet missed the top of the wall. Unknown to me, there was a gully or dip in the terrain right where I launched my leap. A slight twist of the right ankle and next thing I know I am laying on my stomach hanging over the top of the wall. My right arm wrenched behind me because the tree branch didn’t follow my forward movement, but my left hand successfully pointed forward with my knitting needles bared.

I don’t know if it was the snapping of the twigs or if I really screamed but something alerted the guy that things were happening behind him. He whipped around and had the flashlight full on me. I tried to lift the tree branch from behind me, but laying across the wall as I was I had no leverage to lift it. I brandished my knitting needles instead. Addi Turbos really do catch light, even if it is only a flash light’s light. They positively gleamed.

The guy was a nice man. He works for the Water Department in the town I live in. They had a water main break earlier, fixed it and he was checking water samples in the area to make sure the water was safe for drinking. A man doing his job to serve the greater good. How beautiful. How rare. How American.

Read Full Post »

In Robert Frost’s poem Mending Wall a partial line reads “Something there is that doesn’t like a wall,…” and the poem goes on to ponder the “something.”  Change the word wall to hat and that’s my experience with hat knitting.

I wanted to knit two hats using a stranded design. One for me and one for The Skipper. The pattern could not have been better written. Everything was perfectly clear. I got the yarns, I got the needles. And so I knitted.

It was the first time using the yarn I chose. The weight matched what the design called for and the needle sizes matched too. And so I knitted.

The stranded design was lovely and the designer had worked it out so the jog that usually occurs between the end and beginning of a round was part of the pattern. And so I knitted.

The first hat looked a little big on the needles. I ignored the voice that kept saying “It’s a bit big, don’t ya think? Better try it on his head.” And on I knitted.

I blocked the hat while the voice said, “That hat is larger than a watermelon.” When it dried I tried it on The Skipper’s head. The hat was too big. I could slap a big bowl over his head and get the same effect.

Take two: Same yarn, same pattern, smaller needle size. I knit. Then I blocked. The second hat was smaller, but it was still too large. Naturally, my knitter’s response to this was to ask The Skipper what he had done to his head. In my eyes it wasn’t that this second hat was too big, it was that his head had suddenly become too small. “Stop messing with your head,” I told him.

Take three: Different yarn as I had run out of the original, same pattern, same size needles. Smaller needles wouldn’t work with the yarn weight I was using. I knit. I blocked. The Skipper tried it on. It wasn’t as large as the first, nor was it as big as the second, but he had room to grow.I suggested he stop cutting his hair and let it fill out a bit, the hat would fit better.

He’s wearing the third hat, convinced that his head is such that a knitted hat fitting properly can never be.

Yes, there is something that doesn’t like a hat nor me knitting it.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts

Tin Can Knits

modern seamless knits for the whole family

Spin A Yarn

yarn hoarder...accessories fanatic...lover of all things creative

String Geekery

knitting, crochet, other string tricks, and forays into other creative endeavors

kindfibers

In All You Do, Craft No Harm

knittingsarah

I knit. I spin. I live. I write about it.

The Knit Knack's Blog

my handspinning, knitting, natural dye, weaving fibre home

Fringe Association

Knitting ideas, inspiration and free patterns, plus crochet, weaving, and more

Josefin Waltin spinner

For the love of spinning

knit/lab

making things up

Wool n' Spinning

the place where fibre becomes yarn.

Dartmoor Yarns

Tales about a creative life on Dartmoor

notewords

handwork, writing, life, music, books

Compassionknit

Welcome to my little knit corner, where anything goes!

NothingButKnit

yeah right.

Knitting Nuances

A 2015 - 2018 Top 100 Knitting Blog!

Kiwiyarns Knits

A blog about New Zealand yarns, knitting and life

%d bloggers like this: