Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October 15th, 2014

I seem to take it for granted that everyone knows how to knit socks. So when asked how long should a foot of a sock be for a foot that measures 10 inches (25.5) cm from toe to heel, I temporarily experience disorientation. In general, sock knitting requires 3 measurements. Circumference of foot, length of foot, and length of leg. Length of foot and length of leg are knit to their full lengths. Only the circumference of the foot is knit an inch (2.5) cm smaller than the true measurement.

Foot circumference determines the size sock to make. The measurement is taken around the ball of the foot. The ball of the foot is the padded part just below the toes. My circumference is 8.5 inches (21.5) cm, but I would never choose to make my sock that size because it would be too loose. Instead, I choose a sock size of 7.5 inches (19) cm, one inch less than the actual circumference.

An inch (2.5) cm smaller than the actual circumference of the foot is ideal because it helps the sock stay up on the leg. At the same time, it provides enough stretch to easily slip the sock over the heel and ankle. In sock knitting the circumference is the only number that is made smaller than the actual measurement.

Length of foot is measured from the heel to the end of the longest toe. The foot of the sock is knit to that measurement. If the foot is 9 inches (23) cm then the foot of the knitted sock including heel and toe must be 9 inches (23) cm. When a pattern says to knit to 3 inches (7.5) cm less than total foot length before shaping the heel (toe-up socks) or toe (cuff down socks), this is the most likely place where an error can occur resulting in the failure of the sock to fit the foot.

The remedy, however, is easy. Determine your row gauge. How many rows per inch are you getting? Multiply that number by the 3 inches. The answer is the number of rows you need to knit in order to get 3 inches. Now look at the pattern. Count up the number of rows required for the shaping. Does it match your number of rows needed for 3 inches? Probably not. So knitting to 3 inches less isn’t going to work. You need to find the number of inches that does work. To do this, divide the number of rows required for the shaping by the number of rows you’re getting per inch. The answer is the number of inches less you need to work before shaping begins.

In other sock news, The Skipper’s second sock has now become the equivalent of the ball and chain convicts in old movies before sound carried around. Wherever I go, it goes with me. By doing this, I hope to get it finished so I can move on. I have 56 more rounds before bind off.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Tin Can Knits

modern seamless knits for the whole family

Spin A Yarn

yarn hoarder...accessories fanatic...lover of all things creative

String Geekery

knitting, crochet, other string tricks, and forays into other creative endeavors

knittingsarah

I knit. I spin. I live. I write about it.

The Knit Knack's Blog

my handspinning, knitting, natural dye, weaving fibre home

Fringe Association

Knitting ideas, inspiration and free patterns, plus crochet, weaving, and more

Josefin Waltin spinner

For the love of spinning

knit/lab

making things up

Wool n' Spinning

the place where fibre becomes yarn.

Dartmoor Yarns

Tales about a creative life on Dartmoor

notewords

handwork, writing, life, music, books

Compassionknit

Welcome to my little knit corner, where anything goes!

NothingButKnit

yeah right.

Knitting Nuances

A 2015 - 2018 Top 100 Knitting Blog!

Kiwiyarns Knits

A blog about New Zealand yarns, knitting and life

%d bloggers like this: